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CIVILIZING CYBERSPACE:  POWER, POLICY, AND THE INFORMATION SUPERHIGHWAY

Addison-Wesley, 1996

Praise For Civilizing Cyberspace


“Steve Miller has written a readable, thought-providing guide to the information policy conundrums of the age.  E-mail to policy-makers: Read This Book.”

Rep. Edward J. Markey, U.S. Congress


“Finally, here is a book that clarifies the issues and lets those of us who are not computer jocks – female or male – understand what’s going on behind the headlines so that we may become part of the decision-making process.”

Letty Cottin Pogrebin, founding editor, Ms. Magazine

This is the best book I have seen on the public policy debates surround the information superhighway.  Highly recommended for anyone interested in this subject, or for use as a text in classes.”

Gary Chapman, 21st Century Project, University of Texas


“Steve Miller is an authority on the practice of grassroots democracy.  Civilizing Cyberspace provides all of the facts and arguments you need to start organizing for democratic uses of computer networking in your own community.”

Phil Agre, The Network Observer


“This is a call to action to everyone who feels powerless to have a positive impact. Ordinary people can act to make sure that the Information Age has something to do with real human experiences and needs.  This book tells you why it makes a difference to take action and how to do it.”

Deborah Kaplan, World Institute on Disability


Civilizing Cyberspace is the best introduction to the policy issues surrounding the Internet I have seen.  The most impressive thing about Miller’s book is that it avoids hype, overstatement, and polemic.  Miller is [not] someone so blinded by their political prejudices that they can’t communicate with those who don’t share them.

Danny Yee, Linux Journal


“[Miller] has taken complicated issues – such as privacy, the structure of networks, the role for nonprofit communication, and the attempt to define universal service – and distilled them with clarity and grace.”

Pat Aufderheide, In These Times